No Skin Off My Ass. 1991. Directed by Bruce LaBruce. Starring Bruce LaBruce, Klaus von Brücker, and G.B. Jones. Shot in grainy Super 8, the picture centers around a hairdresser who falls for a handsome, taciturn skinhead, and their peculiar courtship is punctuated by memorable sequences with the skin’s sister.
Hustler White. 1996. Directed by Bruce LaBruce and Rick Castro. Starring Bruce LaBruce,Tony Ward, Kevin P. Scott, Ivar Johnson, Glen Meadmore, and Ron Athey. Hustler White begins with a man floating face-down in a jacuzzi. It’s an image straight out of Sunset Boulevard, and the film is likewise a tale of obsessive desire on the margins of Hollywood.
Skin Flick. 1999. Directed by Bruce LaBruce. Starring Steve Masters, Eden Miller, Tom International, and Ralph Steel. The movie revolves around a gang of neo-Nazi London skinheads who lead a life of petty theft, queer bashing, and general thuggery — when not having passionate sex with one another.
Raspberry Reich. 2004. Directed by Bruce LaBruce. Starring Susanne Sachsse, Daniel Bätscher, Andreas Rupprecht, Dean Monroe, and Anton Dickson. A group of leftist German radicals plot to kidnap the son of a wealthy banker, just as the Red Army Faction captured industrialist Hanns-Martin Schleyer and held him for ransom in 1977.
Otto; or, Up with Dead People. 2008. Directed by Bruce LaBruce. Starring Jey Crisfar, Marcel Schlutt, Katharina Klewinghaus, and Guido Sommer. Set in a not-too-distant future in which the undead (many of them gay) have evolved the ability to speak and reason, yet are persecuted by the living for being “an echo of their own somnambulistic, conformist behavior.”
Zombie. 2010. Directed by Bruce LaBruce. Starring François Sagat, Rocco Giovanni, Wolf Hudson, and Eddie Diaz. L.A. Zombie opens with what may be an undead alien emerging from the sea. Roaming wordlessly through the city, he encounters a variety of fresh corpses — a gang member, a vagrant — and humps them back into life.
Offing Jack. 2011. Directed by Bruce LaBruce. Starring Finn and Kay Garnellen. 14 minutes.

BRUCE LABRUCE’S MOMA

There’s no doubt that legendary film director, writer and photographer Bruce LaBruce has corrupted (and continues to do so) an entire generation of queer kids with his hypersexual dissections of various cinematic genres for the past 25 years. Tomorrow, the 51-year-old Canadian opens the doors to a retrospective of his groundbreaking work at Manhattan’s MoMA.

LaBruce studied film at York University in Toronto and directed his first film in 1989. Named “I Know What It’s Like to Be Dead,“ the short super-8 movie starred LaBruce himself as well as Linda Evans. Some of his films have gone rather unknown while others have achieved worldwide cult status. Films like his feature debut No Skin Off My Ass (1991), Hustler White (1996) starring Tony Ward, The Raspberry Reich (2004), which sees a left-wing terrorist group, consisting of several homosexual men and a female leader, kidnaps the son of a wealthy industrialist have all become iconic in queer circles. Layered with scathing wit and a fundamental rejection of capitalist control over the mind and body, his films take to task the mainstream porn industry as well as Hollywood.

The MoMA retrospective consists of several screenings each day from April 23rd to May 2nd. For complete screening schedule, click here.

No Skin Off My Ass. 1991. Directed by Bruce LaBruce. Starring Bruce LaBruce, Klaus von Brücker, and G.B. Jones. Shot in grainy Super 8, the picture centers around a hairdresser who falls for a handsome, taciturn skinhead, and their peculiar courtship is punctuated by memorable sequences with the skin’s sister.
Hustler White. 1996. Directed by Bruce LaBruce and Rick Castro. Starring Bruce LaBruce,Tony Ward, Kevin P. Scott, Ivar Johnson, Glen Meadmore, and Ron Athey. Hustler White begins with a man floating face-down in a jacuzzi. It’s an image straight out of Sunset Boulevard, and the film is likewise a tale of obsessive desire on the margins of Hollywood.
Skin Flick. 1999. Directed by Bruce LaBruce. Starring Steve Masters, Eden Miller, Tom International, and Ralph Steel. The movie revolves around a gang of neo-Nazi London skinheads who lead a life of petty theft, queer bashing, and general thuggery — when not having passionate sex with one another.
Raspberry Reich. 2004. Directed by Bruce LaBruce. Starring Susanne Sachsse, Daniel Bätscher, Andreas Rupprecht, Dean Monroe, and Anton Dickson. A group of leftist German radicals plot to kidnap the son of a wealthy banker, just as the Red Army Faction captured industrialist Hanns-Martin Schleyer and held him for ransom in 1977.
Otto; or, Up with Dead People. 2008. Directed by Bruce LaBruce. Starring Jey Crisfar, Marcel Schlutt, Katharina Klewinghaus, and Guido Sommer. Set in a not-too-distant future in which the undead (many of them gay) have evolved the ability to speak and reason, yet are persecuted by the living for being “an echo of their own somnambulistic, conformist behavior.”
Zombie. 2010. Directed by Bruce LaBruce. Starring François Sagat, Rocco Giovanni, Wolf Hudson, and Eddie Diaz. L.A. Zombie opens with what may be an undead alien emerging from the sea. Roaming wordlessly through the city, he encounters a variety of fresh corpses — a gang member, a vagrant — and humps them back into life.
Offing Jack. 2011. Directed by Bruce LaBruce. Starring Finn and Kay Garnellen. 14 minutes.
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